Preliminary notes

Meant as an addition - not as a replacement

Please note Progress for Apple Reminders is not designed to replace the Apple Reminders stock app. It is designed to serve as a complementary tool which, once configured, helps you to stay on track. “Doing the work” still takes place in Apple Reminders.

Display styles

In Progress for Apple Reminders you’re able to choose between the display styles progress and remaining. You can choose whichever you prefer.

1. Let’s start: Define your goals

The concept of “reaching goals” is at the heart of Progress for Apple Reminders. As a consequence the first step you need to do in order to make Progress for Apple Reminders actually useful is to define your goals.

Here are some examples for such goals

• Finish all to-dos of a given project

• Finish three to-dos of a given project per week

• Read everyday

• …

2. Create a report to track your progress

Once you defined your goals, it’s time to add reports in Progress for Apple Reminders. You should add one report for each goal.

Example: Finish all to-dos of a given project

You have a bunch of stuff in the Apple Reminders list Studies and your goal is to get everything done. To track your progress add a report with the following settings:

Style: personal taste (see preliminary notes above)

List: Studies

Search term: none

Period: overall

Number: all

Depends on priority: Disabled

Example: Finish three to-dos per week of a given project

You have a bunch of stuff in the Apple Reminders list Studies and your goal is to work on these regularly: You want to get at least three to-dos done per week. To track your progress add a report with the following settings:

Style: personal taste (see preliminary notes above)

List: Studies

Search term: none

Period: current week

Number: 3

Depends on priority: Disabled

Example: Read everyday

You’re now maybe tempted to add a list Reading to Apple Reminders and report on this, like we’ve done in the two examples above. But think about it for a second: If you add a list for each report, you might end up with tons of lists and things can get out of hand fairly quick.

That’s why we use a different strategy this time: Let’s define a #read tag. Even though Apple Reminders does not support tags natively, we’re still able to add them as simple text. Now, to track how your doing on your #read tag, we add a report with the following settings:

Style: personal taste (see preliminary notes above)

List: all

Search term: #read

Period: current week

Number: 7

Depends on priority: Disabled

Stay engaged with the Today-Widget

To see the progress bar in the Today-Screen, make sure you’ve enabled “Show in Today-Widget” in your report configuration.

Get creative

This guide should give you a brief idea of what’s possible with Progress for Apple Reminders. Now start defining your goals, add reports and start beating the bar!

Download on the App Store

Marco Betschart

Marco Betschart loves the never ending journey of exploration, self growth and tech evolution.